Fashion Blogs to Follow

Beauty, Dating, Fashion, Quick Read, Travel, Workplace

These are my most visited blogs and I’ll tell you why!

purse 'n boots

pursenboots.blogspot.com

Written by: Ashley Glorioso

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Senior Stylist for Nasty Gal.  She is a bad ass boho chick, who knows how to make fun of herself and some of her off the wall fashion choices.  I love the little tidbits she writes at the bottom of her photo’s that chronicle a bit of her life and how/why she put that particular outfit together.  She wears lots of Zara, For Love and Lemons, Nasty Gal and amazing vintage finds.  Her style faves seem to be booties, ripped tees, sequins, fur jackets, lace/knits and a touch of well layered and simple jewelery.  Check out her feature on the Nasty Gal Blog as well.

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talesofendearment.com

Written By: Natalie Joos

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I think of her as the real life Carrie Bradshaw.  A real, New York City casting agent and consultant to fashion brands across the board.  She’s a street style favorite and has a look that is so uniquely her own, I have yet to see anyone else master it quite as well.  With pieces of clothing that look more like artwork to me, she is able to mix and match bold prints and shapes that many would never think to do.  She pulls it all off, always, with simple hair and makeup that rivals all the gold and glitter I’m usually attracted to.  A must read from vintage to modern fashion lovers.

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chicityfashion.com

Written By: Jena Gambaccini

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I am not totally sure how I stumbled upon this blog, but I think it was through the popular page on Instagram.  I’d love to live in Chicago at some point, so I started following chicityfashion with the idea that I could get a feel for what the fashion there is like.  Turns out Jena is a girl after my own heart who loves food, fashion and living the city life!  Her style has a bit of a structured, tomboy feel, with lots of girly details.  She loves everything over sized, simple gold jewelry and mani Monday.

Above are my top three, that I literally look at almost everyday.  Here are a few others to check out.

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thezoereport.com

Written By: Rachel Zoe & Team

The Zoe Report is less of a blog and more straight to the point fashion and beauty recommendations.  The reason I don’t frequent it more often is because the products are often out of my price range, which just makes me sad.  I am not a fan of window shopping, which is what it feels like to oggle over designer goods on The Zoe Report.  What I do like is the the coverage of fashion trends and happenings in the fashion world.

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refinery29.com

Founded By: Philippe Von Bories, Justin Sefano, Christene Barberich & Piera Gelardi

This site has many writers now, but started from a small team of four friends.  Their posts are definitely aimed at the mid-20’s gal which obviously appeals to me. The overall tone of the site is best described as cheeky.  Most of their articles have a fun/naughty twist which makes reading about things like cures for acne more tolerable.  I’ve put to good use much of their beauty and fashion advice.

 

 

Gender Norms in Dance

Dance, Gender

Let’s talk about gender roles in dance.

All styles of dance have traditional gender norms. Ballet showcases the women, while the men in ballet have been teasingly called the “tote and carry,” just there to lift. Social dances have the men leading the women, while once again showcasing the women and making sure they look good. Nowadays, the contemporary styles have begun to stray from the norm and have challenged the status-quo of the older styles. For example, Fosse had his male and female ensemble members dance the same choreography with the same stylistic intentions. Look at this video of dancers from Chicago doing All That Jazz and see how every person on stage was dancing exactly the same.

Seeing this change has helped me start to think about and challenge gender norms in dance. But an important lesson while teaching has made me think differently.

A few summers back I was teaching introductory ballet and tap combo classes for 4 to 7 year olds. One week it was Prince and Princess themed. The boys were given capes and crowns, the girls were given wands and tiaras. The boys were marching, the girls were skipping. The boys were bowing, the girls were curtsying. Nothing was out of the ordinary.

Before class the next day, the mother of one of the boys came up to me. She said that her son was torn up after class the day before because he wanted to wear a tiara but was too embarrassed to ask. He was experiencing confusion around what was expected of him and what felt normal. I was dumbfounded. I had never once considered this as something one of my students would be battling.

Now I teach all my young students how to march, skip, bow, and curtsy. If we dress up, I encourage mixing and matching, even dressing up myself to make others feel more comfortable with it. I want to encourage dancers to become their best selves.

However, you have to take all of these things with a grain of salt. If you want to dance in classical ballets, you will have to learn to embrace those typical roles. If you want to dance in Chicago on Broadway, you will have to learn to let go of your preconceived notions of what your gender should dance like and learn Fosse’s style.

I don’t see these norms changing anytime soon, but as teachers we should prepare students for anything. — J